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Upcycling - using second hand sheets

Last night I got on the finishing streak of upcycling various second hand sheets that I obtained from the Op Shop for $2-3 each.
I have been making duvet covers for our single beds as we just don't have enough in the winter when washing does not always dry. I like to use plain sheeting and am a big fan of natural materials, so it has to be 100% cotton and generally white. Then we don't need a top sheet to the bed as the cover operates as a duvet cover and sheet. Makes it easy for the boys to make in the morning and we don't get the whole - sheet down at their feet - scenario.
I made two white duvet covers last week and last night I made a purple one for Eli. It is his favourite colour.
By mistake I deleted the photo of the main finished duvet cover (and it is in the wash now).

Instructions; - sew four straight seams to make a duvet (takes 30mins max)


1. Get two single sheets or one double / queen (so that there are two layers and lay them on the floor. Make sure that the nice stitched top end of the sheets are both at the same end and if you have a wrong and right side then put them right sides together. As this means the bottom of your duvet is already made and thick enough to take either domes or buttons as closure.

two top ends of the sheet which will become bottom end of the duvet. All ready for buttons or domes.     
2. Lay an existing correct fitting duvet cover over these two layers. Put the bottom of the duvet in line with the top of the sheets and one side of the duvet in line with one of the sides of the sheet. This way you only need to cut to fit down one side (allow 3cm seam allowance) and along the end of the duvet.

3. Stitch both sides together starting at what will be the bottom of the duvet (that nicely finished top of the sheet. Then stitch along the top seam. This will make sure if you have cut it a bit wonky you can correct it, but the bottom opening of the duvet will still look professional as the seams will match.

4. Turn the duvet through so that the seams are all on the inside. Then iron those seams. Go back to the sewing machine and start on one side and sew to the top - sew with the side of the machine foot running in line along the edge of the duvet - , turn and sew along the top, turn and sew down the other side. This is called a french seam and means that you do not need to zig zag or get your overlocker out as it seals the original seam inside itself. It also gives a really good finish to the duvet making the edges always look sharp.

The finished look of the french seam
5. Close the bottom two edges of the duvet whatever way you prefer. Make buttonholes on one side and sew on buttons or use domes.


One finished duvet.

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